Coffee or Tea (or both)?

Dear reader,

As a Brazilian I have been drinking coffee since I was a little boy!  🙂  In all these years I haven’t met a single Brazilian that doesn’t like to drink coffee! It’s not coincidence that my country is one of the largest producers of coffee in the world.

On the other hand I’m a vivid appreciator of tea too! When I lived in Brazil I used to drink tea most of time due to some health problems such as constipation, cold, stomachache, etc. My country has a rich variety of 100% natural tea leaves used for medicinal purposes, so a lot of Brazilians drink some kind of tea instead of taking a traditional synthetic medicine.

And when I came to Japan for the first time almost thirty years ago, I was immediately attracted by the taste of the authentic green tea!  😉  Here on this side of the world people drink more tea than coffee due to cultural reasons and also because there is a huge variety of tea in this country.

The purpose of this article is not to ask you to make a choice between coffee or tea, but on the contrary: is to explore further the benefits of these two wonderful drinks that have been part of my life for a long time. Therefore I intend, in a near future, to write an article exclusively about coffee and another one only about tea, where I will describe the main types and flavors of each one around the world, especially in Brazil and Japan where I have lived for decades.

Now if you allow me I’m going to fill my mug with instant coffee and powder milk because I have some serious work to do, OK?  😉

Meanwhile enjoy the photographs below and stay tuned, please!  🙂

Typical cup of coffee in Brazil. Known as "cafezinho" (small coffee), is extremely popular among Brazilians.

Typical cup of coffee in Brazil. Known as “cafezinho” (small coffee), is extremely popular among Brazilians. It’s consumed everywhere and anytime around the country: at home, work, restaurants and bars.

 

Green tea is the most popular drink in Japan and is part of Japanese culture.

Green tea is the most popular drink in Japan and has been part of Japanese culture and cuisine for centuries.

Until next month! 😉

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Christy
    Feb 27, 2017 @ 16:54:24

    I’m a tea drinker due to adverse internal reactions to coffee. Regardless, what I value most with either hot beverage is the connections between two people, or a group. Holding a hot mug of either can be a conversation starter.

    Reply

  2. WILSON PARDI JUNIOR
    Apr 28, 2017 @ 05:41:56

    Dear Christy,

    Thank you so much for your comment above and sorry for my (usual) late reply!

    Indeed, a hot coffee or tea can be a nice starter for a conversation between two or more people, especially in an informal environment.

    I also do understand your adverse reaction to coffee since I have a similar problem. My stomach is so sensitive that I often say to people that I drink “milk with coffee” instead of “coffee with milk”… 🙂

    Cheers from sunny Japan,

    Reply

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